The short-story of a Simpleton and Big English

ignoramus
ˌɪɡnəˈreɪməs/
noun
noun: ignoramus; plural noun: ignoramuses
an ignorant or stupid person.
synonym; a clodpoll.

Why must Big English be used? A fool is simply a foolish person; not an ignoramus. An ignoramus does not even know what ignoramus means. How then does an ignoramus know he is an ignoramus?
We must learn to be simple.
Writing as an art may have evolved from articulating thoughts and languages to be read, understood and appreciated but it certainly does not mean writers must intentionally twist their thoughts and opinions; leaving a growing community of manically bewildered Simpletons behind. What is the use of writing an impossible read filled with Big English? A Simpleton asks.
Man no suppose dey chop biscuit-bone peppersoup wen beta peppered boneless chicken dey table naw.
Writing, an interesting phenomenon, is the safest and cheapest time traveling machine there is and contrary to what our wishes may be, writing is the only legal and sane way of reading minds. Suspended in time, A Simpleton sees the future, past and present. A Simpleton that can read minds! A Simpleton that is no longer an ignoramus.
But why, when given the opportunity to redirect a people, a chance to change perceptions and privilege to entertain, must writers complicate it with this brawny Big English? A Simpleton asks.
Perhaps Big English is entertaining and gives deeper meaning to words and sentences, weighty and thought-provoking too. A couple of Non-Simpletons have indicated their preference for meat and not milk. Perhaps this Big English is only for those with Big Teeth.
If truly writing is art, A Simpleton asks that writers must not make it abstract. An abstract art is not worthless but what pleasure is there in hanging on your wall a meaningless piece of masterpiece? Aesthetically pleasing, yes; it goes perfectly with curtains, absolutely. But art wasn’t meant to complement the curtain, it was meant to be understood. A Simpleton insists that writing must be fluid, succinct, remarkably engaging and revelatory.
A Simpleton knows these things.

P.S: Words have more meaning when understood. Writing should be understood not guessed.

Kind Regards,

@UnenAmeji

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2 thoughts on “The short-story of a Simpleton and Big English

  1. Writing, an interesting phenomenon, is the safest and cheapest time traveling machine there is and contrary to what our wishes may be, writing is the only legal and sane way of reading minds.

    That was great!

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